28 May 2013

Promises of Social Justice for India’s Landless /  Promesses de justice sociale pour les sans-terres en Inde

Promises of Social Justice for India’s Landless / Promesses de justice sociale pour les sans-terres en Inde

Author: Ekta Europe Admin  /  Categories: News  /  Rate this article:
No rating

Article on Global Voices in English, by Marie Bohner, translation by Andrew Kowalczuk

(article in French language below / article en français ci-dessous)

As rapid industrialization and development in India requisitions land, and the government grapples with a legal framework to deal with the displaced, activist group Ekta Parishad, whose name means “forum of unity” in Hindi, has campaigned on behalf of the landless and homeless.

The extensive work of Ekta Parishad in the most impoverished rural areas of India was recognized in a meeting with Minister for Rural Development Jairam Ramesh, on 15 April, 2013, affirming an earlier agreement with the government in favor of the landless, and the poor in general. The organization applies the Gandhian principle of non-violent action to help the population to better control the resources which allow them to survive: land, water and forests.

The most impoverished people in India, the Dalits and Adivasis, especially women, are not only forgotten, but are also the main victims of rampant growth [fr] in recent years, which is centered primarily around industrialization. In February 2013, the National Dalit and Adavasi Women's Congress was cited in a recent blog article by Sujatha Surepally, which also denounces this sad reality:

The hall is echoing with the furious voice of Dayamani Barla, veteran Adivasi activist from Jharkhand. She is trying to unite people against mining in Jharkhand, around 108 mining companies are waiting to destroy Adivasi life in the name of mining, first they come for coal, next they say power houses, it continues, we are pushed out and out further. How do we live without our land? Spectacular speech for an hour, pin drop silence all around, everyone is identifying with her pain and agony. At the end of it, what is she is trying to convey? Humko Jeene Do! Let us live our own life! If this is called development, we care a damn about it!

Marches for Justice

Based upon transfer of important natural resources to industrial investors, both Indian and foreign, this growth has hindered the path of commitments to environmental matters. Local populations, of whom 70 percent still live in rural areas today, and who are dependent on natural resources for their survival, were often displaced by land grabs, made without any compensation.

Given the 60 million people who were displaced without compensation between 1947 and 2004, and the 25 million hectares of land requisitioned, activists from Ekta Parishad organized Janadesh - the “People's Verdict”, in 2007, which was a month-long march of 25,000 people from the city of Gwalior to the national capital, Delhi, to demand rights for the landless. These videos describe Janadesh [fr] and its Indian and international support [fr].

These grievances were heard, and resulted in laws such as the “Forest Rights Act“. Subrat Kumar Sahu commented in an online article in April 2010 about the law :

The Bill stated: “For the first time in the history of Indian forests, the state formally admits that, for long, rights have been denied to forest-dwelling people, and the new forest law attempts not only to right that ‘historic injustice’ but also give forest communities’ role primacy in future forest management.” Forest-dependent communities that were being pushed deeper and deeper into what remained of the forests were pleasantly surprised by the passage of FRA 2006, although forest-rights activists were cynical about the state’s intentions. Many called the Bill “a paper tiger”, like so many other pieces of legislation in India.

Despite these progressive laws, few achievements have been effectively realized since they were passed. This led Ekta Parishad and more than 2,000 other organizations to organize in October 2012 the Jan Satyagraha, or “The March for Justice”, again from Gwalior to Delhi, which was attended by 50,000 people on its first day.

The video , subtitled in French, “Act or Die,” summarizes the alternatives for these people.

According to the blog Rexistance Inde [fr]:

Difficile de dénombrer les marcheurs, mais il faut compter presque cinq heures pour voir défiler l'ensemble du cortège. (…) Nous traversons (…) quelques villages où les gens accueillent la Marche avec des colliers et des jets de pétales de fleurs jaunes et orange.

It was difficult to count the number of marchers, but it took almost five hours to watch the passing of the entire procession (…) We passed through (…) some villages where people welcomed the March with necklaces of yellow and orange flowers, and by throwing flower petals.

Promises to keep

The petitions of 2007, which had focused on landless rural people, were this time expanded to include the homeless, the effective application of laws against poverty, the technical means for such application, and finally, a precise timetable for the fulfillment of these promises. The summation of these demands was written in the 10-point agreement between the marchers and the Indian Government [fr] on 11 October, 2012, and was confirmed by a new meeting between the authorities and the marchers in April 2013.

The blog Rexistance Inde [fr] stated in an article on 31 December, 2012:

Le gouvernement fédéral s'engage à plancher sur une politique de réformes agraires et à faire pression auprès des gouvernements locaux – l'allocation de terres étant leur prérogative – pour permettre aux populations marginalisées de rester sur leurs terres, ou d'en obtenir de nouvelles pour y travailler. Et pour y vivre ! Car l'une des clauses centrales, et nouvelles, de l'engagement consiste à inclure le droit au logement pour chaque famille pauvre et sans terre. [...] Mais Ekta Parishad n'est pas naïf. Au contraire, fort de l'expérience de la Janadesh en 2007 dont le peu de promesses obtenues n'avait pas vraiment été tenues, le mouvement reste vigilant, à tel point qu'il lance dans la foulée de la signature de l'accord un appel à soutien international pour signifier au gouvernement que les “invisibles” ne le lâcheront pas d'une semelle, et que l'œil de la conscience citoyenne veille, partout dans le monde.

The federal government is starting a campaign of agrarian political reforms, and to put pressure on local governments – since the allocation of land is their prerogative – to allow marginalized populations to remain on their land, or to find new land where they can work. And where they can live ! Since one of the new, and central, clauses of the agreement consists of the inclusion of a right to housing for each poor and landless family [...] But Ekta Parishad is not naive. On the contrary, given the experience from Janadesh in 2007, from which few of the promises obtained have truly been kept, the movement remains vigilant. To the point that, in the wake of the signing of the agreement, it launched an appeal for international support, to signal to the government that the “invisibles” will not retreat an inch, and that the eyes of civic consciousness are watching, throughout the world.

The support initiatives, at the Indian, European and international levels, were also redoubled during recent months, to ensure that the agreement will be respected by the Indian government, as stated in a collective letter sent to Minister Jairam Ramesh, thanking him for his actions since the beginning of the year on behalf of the most impoverished, but also encouraging him not to turn back from such a promising path.

Hope and caution

The agreement reached between Ekta Parishad and the Indian government may well represent the promise of a new paradigm for development and distribution of natural resources within India, and perhaps elsewhere. On the eve of general elections in India, it is time for mobilization and hope, but equally well for caution.

V. Rajagopal, President of Ekta Parishad, confirmed that the movement intends to make its voice heard clearly during the electoral campaign which is now beginning in India, in an online article on Firstpost India, on 12 April, 2013:

2014 is an election year, and all political parties are drafting their manifestos. And our effort is to make land reform figure prominently in their manifestos. We are talking to different political parties. And keeping the next election in mind, we have come up with a slogan – Aage zameen peeche vote, nahi zameen toh nahi vote (first land, then vote; no land, no vote).

Article online : http://globalvoicesonline.org/2013/05/22/promises-of-social-justice-for-indias-landless/

Article in French on Global Voices, by Marie Bohner

Le long travail effectué par Ekta Parishad (« forum de l’unité » en hindi), dans les zones rurales les plus pauvres de l'Inde, vient d'être reconnu lors d'une réunion du 15 avril 2013 avec Jairam Ramesh, Ministre pour le Développement rural [anglais], validant un accord antérieur avec le gouvernement, en faveur des sans-terre et des plus pauvres en général. L'organisation applique le principe gandhien d’action non-violente pour aider le peuple à mieux contrôler les ressources qui lui permettent de subsister : la terre, l’eau et la forêt.

En Inde, les populations les plus pauvres, dalits et adivasis, en particulier les femmes, sont non seulement les oubliées mais aussi les premières victimes de la croissance effrénée de ces dernières années, qui s'est orchestrée principalement autour de l'industrialisation. Le congrès national des femmes dalits et advasis, en février 2013, est cité dans un billet de blog récent [anglais] de Sujatha Surepally et dénonce aussi cette triste réalité :

Dans la salle résonne la voix furieuse de Dayamani Barla, militante adivasi de longue date originaire du Jharkhand. Elle essaie de réunir les gens contre l”industrie minière dans les Jharkhand, où environ 108 compagnies minières sont à la veille de détruire la vie adivasi au nom des mines, d'abord ils viennent pour le charbon, ensuite pour l'électricité, cela continue, nous sommes repoussés de plus en plus loin. Comment vivre sans notre terre? Un discours spectaculaire pendant une heure, un silence de mort ensuite, tout le monde compatit à ses peines et à sa souffrance. Finalement, qu'essaie-t-elle de transmettre? Humko Jeene Do! Laissez nous vivre notre propre vie ! Si c'est cela que vous appelez développement, nous ne voulons pas en entendre parler !

Marches pour la Justice

Basée sur le transfert d'importantes ressources naturelles aux investisseurs industriels, indiens et étrangers, cette croissance a égratigné au passage les engagements en matière environnementale [anglais]. Les populations locales, dont environ 70% habitent encore aujourd'hui en zone rurale et sont dépendantes des ressources naturelles pour leur survie, ont été souvent déplacées par des accaparements de terres faits sans aucune compensation.

Se basant sur les 60 millions de personnes déplacées sans compensation entre 1947 et 2004, et sur les 25 millions d'hectares de terres réquisitionnés, les militants d'Ekta Parishad ont organisé en 2007 Janadesh – le ‘verdict du peuple', une marche de 25.000 personnes de Gwâlior à Delhi, pendant un mois, afin d'exiger des droits pour les sans-terre. Les vidéos (en français) décrivent Janadesh et le soutien indien et international.

Ces demandes ont été entendues, et ont donné naissance à des lois telles que le « Forest Rights Act ». Subrat Kumar Sahu commente dans un article en ligne [anglais] d'avril 2010, à propos de la loi :

La loi dit: “Pour la première fois dans l'histoire des forêts indiennes, l'Etat admet formellement que, pendant longtemps, les droits des habitants des forêts ont été niés, et la nouvelle loi concernant les forêts ne vise pas seulement à réparer cette ‘injustice historique’ mais veut aussi donner aux communautés qui habitent les forêts un ‘rôle essentiel dans la future gestion de la forêt'.” [...] même si les militants pour les droits forestiers ont tout de suite manifesté un certain cynisme par rapport aux intentions étatiques. Beaucoup d'entre eux ont appelé cette loi un ‘tigre de papier', comme tant d'autres lois indiennes.

Malgré ces lois très progressistes, peu de réalisations ont été effectives depuis. Cela a poussé Ekta Parishad et plus de 2000 autres organisations à susciter en octobre 2012 Jan Satyagraha, Marche pour la Justice, à nouveau de Gwâlior à Delhi, qui a rassemblé dès le premier jour 50 000 personnes.

La vidéo , sous-titrée en français, “Agir ou mourir”, résume l'alternative pour ces populations.

Selon le blog Rexistance Inde :

Difficile de dénombrer les marcheurs, mais il faut compter presque cinq heures pour voir défiler l'ensemble du cortège. (…) Nous traversons (…) quelques villages où les gens accueillent la Marche avec des colliers et des jets de pétales de fleurs jaunes et orange.

Un accord signé en 2012, des promesses à faire tenir

Les demandes de 2007, surtout concentrées sur les paysans sans-terre, étaient cette fois élargies, incluant les sans-abri, la mise en application effective de lois de lutte contre la pauvreté, les moyens techniques de cette mise en application, et enfin un calendrier précis pour la réalisation de ces promesses. C'est la somme de ces demandes qui a été signée dans l’accord en 10 points entre les marcheurs et le gouvernement indien le 11 octobre 2012, et validée par la nouvelle rencontre entre les autorités et les marcheurs d'avril 2013.

Le blog Rexistance Inde témoigne, dans un billet du 31 décembre 2012 :

Le gouvernement fédéral s'engage à plancher sur une politique de réformes agraires et à faire pression auprès des gouvernements locaux – l'allocation de terres étant leur prérogative – pour permettre aux populations marginalisées de rester sur leurs terres, ou d'en obtenir de nouvelles pour y travailler. Et pour y vivre ! Car l'une des clauses centrales, et nouvelles, de l'engagement consiste à inclure le droit au logement pour chaque famille pauvre et sans terre. [...] Mais Ekta Parishad n'est pas naïf. Au contraire, fort de l'expérience de la Janadesh en 2007 dont le peu de promesses obtenues n'avait pas vraiment été tenues, le mouvement reste vigilant, à tel point qu'il lance dans la foulée de la signature de l'accord un appel à soutien international pour signifier au gouvernement que les “invisibles” ne le lâcheront pas d'une semelle, et que l'œil de la conscience citoyenne veille, partout dans le monde.

Les initiatives de soutien au niveau indien, européen et international se sont aussi multipliées ces derniers mois pour s'assurer du respect de l'accord signé par le gouvernement indien, comme cette lettre commune envoyée au Ministre Jairam Ramesh [anglais], le félicitant pour ses actions depuis ce début d'année en faveur des plus démunis, mais l'encourageant aussi à ne pas s'arrêter en si bon chemin.

Espoir et circonspection

L'accord initié entre Ekta Parishad et le gouvernement indien pourrait bien être la promesse d'un nouveau paradigme de développement et de distribution des richesses naturelles, en Inde et peut-être au-delà. Mais à l'aube d'élections générales en Inde, l'heure est à la mobilisation et à l'espérance autant qu'à la circonspection.

V. Rajagopal, Président de Ekta Parishad, a affirmé que le mouvement comptait clairement faire entendre sa voix lors de la campagne électorale qui commence actuellement en Inde, dans un article en ligne de Firstpost India du 12 avril 2013 [anglais] :

2014 est une année d'élections et tous les partis politiques sont en train d'ébaucher leurs manifestes. Nos efforts sont dirigés vers une place proéminente pour une réforme agraire et foncière dans leurs manifestes. C'est en pensant à ces élections que nous avons mis au point le slogan suivant: Aage zameen peeche vote, nahi zameen toh nahi vote (d'abord des terres, ensuite des votes, pas de terres pas de votes).

Article en ligne sur Global Voices : http://fr.globalvoicesonline.org/2013/05/12/144165/

Le même article est aussi disponible en russe ici.

 

 

Number of views (22002)      Comments (0)

Please login or register to post comments.